How much MHash does it take to mine 1 BTC Bitcoin Step ...

I own 179 BTC, here is my story

I am not a wealthy person by any means, but Bitcoin has helped.
I discovered Bitcoin via a post on overclock.net on April 27th, 2011. I believe the price was about $1.50/coin then. I read the posts about people mining them, did some research, and immediately started my Radeon card mining them. I had a 4770 back then.
There was an exchange to sell Bitcoins for linden dollars (Second Life currency) and then I could sell those for paypal dollars. Within a day I had proven to my wife that I could make money with this Bitcoin thing. Despite us being in a position where we couldn't even pay our credit cards, I took the $1100 we had and bought 4 5850's, some power supplies, and some cheap craigslist computers. I figured that if this whole Bitcoin thing failed miserably, at least I had some decent computer hardware I could resell and recover most of the cost. I immediately sold one 5850 for greater-than-market value since they were in demand and I needed the money, and started the other 3 mining. At one point, I was mining nearly 8 coins a day. I bought a few more cards as time went on and continued GPU mining for as long as it was viable.
This whole thing saved us financially. I was able to sell the Bitcoins and settle on my unpayable credit card debts. I held on to a few during the crash but managed to sell most of them at $10 or more, fortunately. After that I started saving them, since they were worth so little. I bought some of the early BFL FPGA miners, the ones that were measured in MHashes not GHashes. After mining with those for a while and then selling them to someone who wanted them more than I did, I had more than 450 BTC. I took the plunge and pre-ordered BFL's latest offerings, the 60GH singles, the day they were available, becoming one of the first on the preorder list. Little did I know I would have been much better off just holding those coins...
Regardless, I did eventually receive those singles, and managed to get about 225 BTC out of them before they were no longer worth running. I've been slowly selling the stash as we needed for remodel projects around the house and for miscellaneous expenses, though I finally no longer need to do so, as we've been able to pay off more debts and have more income than expenses each month. Now I've got a nice pile of savings, and I'm hoping to someday be able to use it to buy a better house in a better neighborhood.
I generally don't tell people that I have just about all my liquid assets in Bitcoin, as they would call me crazy. They might be right. But it's a risk I'm willing to take. I do have some equity in my house, and some retirement accounts, but neither is worth more than my BTC stash.
So that's MY story, what's yours?
submitted by bitcoinzzzz to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

From one newbie to any others who see this: Don't mine. Especially if all you got is a Macbook Pro.

I've been reading about Bitcoin for a while and found it quite fascinating. My interest started when my friend's brother mined 8 Bitcoin and apparently sold them for about $3000 each (bearing in mind I have no idea what his setup is like and how long he was mining for).
So I thought, hell yeah if all I gotta do is leave my computer on for a few days and maybe get half a bitcoin or so why not? So then I decided to educate myself on mining and how to go about it (some useful links in the "Will I earn money by mining?" thread in the sidebar).
After figuring out my computer's specifications and using various online calculators (also in that linked thread), I discovered that with my 2011 Macbook pro I'd have to be mining constantly for a year to earn the equivalent of about $0.01 USD.
I thought it was an error at first but then discovered the machines that the pros were using got up to a maximum of around 14,000,000 Mhash/s. My Macbook Pro does 16.289 Mhash/s. Not to mention the price of those machines and the cost of running them.
I learnt this all in about 1 hour and promptly decided I am not going to be a miner.
submitted by Spidey16 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Setting up mining pools

Hello everyone.
I want to get back into bitcoin mining pools. I noticed Deepbit is just wiped off the face of the earth.
I got my guiminer set up again and I'm getting 520 Mhash/s.
But what's troubling me is that on slushpool, the workers shows up online when I start, but it won't register the worker as online. It's always offline.
So I started up f2pool and the same thing happened. The worker shows up on my profile in f2pool but the status is inactive.
I feel like I'm fucking up something. https://i.imgur.com/EkdF8b0.png https://i.imgur.com/mlTT4AX.png
submitted by nonametogive to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Switch to Litecoin after the difficulty increase, or stay with Bitcoin?

So I am mining with a 5970 and getting ~700 mhash/s. This new difficulty brings my earnings down to about $2.70 a day. I can probably get $3 a day mining litecoins, but that is dependent on price of litecoin v. bitcoin and other stuff like that.
(above calculated using litecoin and bitcoin profit calculators)
If the price of Bitcoin increases again I would hate to miss it. What do you guys think?
submitted by seidelryan to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

This is how much I believe in Bitcoin...

Here is a short timeline of my bitcoin activities:
Am I crazy? Probably a little.
Am I worried? Not at all.
Going into this... I was expecting bitcoins to become worthless in the near future... and even if that happened, I was prepared to sell all of my recently purchased computer equipment on ebay for an approximate 30% loss. So out of the probably $10k I spent on mining equipment... I can only ever stand to lose about $3k of it so long as I sell within a few months. (As it stands however with cards becoming more and more scarce... I just sold one of the 5970s I purchased for a few hundred more than I paid for it 2 months ago! So I might actually make money on selling my hardware!!!)
Within 3 months of finding bitcoins; it has completely consumed my entire life, all of my "money", and I am loving every minute of it. I have convinced 3 friends to buy some mining rigs, although I warned them not to go as "crazy" as I did, they each have about 2Ghps of mining equipment humming along at their places and all of us have paid off our initial investment.
How much do you believe in bitcoins?
P.S. AMA!
submitted by HighBeamHater to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin N00b help!

Hey fellows I am new to Bitcoin, I wanted to get started so I searched various how to videos and websites but they were mostly complicated though I grasped some concepts through these. By http://startbitcoin.com/ I was able to setup my Bitcoin journey through use of BitCoin GPU miner and Slush Pool. Now I have few questions 1) What is difference between online wallet and desktop ones. I created online wallet from blockchain.info due to fact that desktop wallet bitcoin qt requires download chains of data and I dont have sufficient internet connection. 2) If I have created wallet online then can I use in desktop wallets? What if online wallet service goes down. Does it mean I will loose all my coins? 3) I am mining through GPUminer and it shows some value of shares accepted and Mhash/s , what does it mean? 4) When will I receive Bitcoin, my account on slush pool page says Estimated reward for current round whose values goes up and down? 5)At bottom of account page there is value of current share and Mhash/s value what does it mean? What is estimated award , confirmed and unconfirmed? 6)What happens to my mining if internet connection goes down and computer shuts download!
submitted by hussanali to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Any point to running a 7870 @ 390 Mhash/s?

Just started looking into bitcoin and was interested by the mining side of it. I don't plan on getting into it seriously at the moment but I thought I'd give it a go and see what I could do. I'm getting 390 Mhash/s right now and I'm not entirely sure what that translates to as far as success is measured. Any hints/tips for a new miner? I've been lurking forums and whatnot for what ever I can find but I have to admit I'm still a little confused as most of what I've found seems to require a decent knowledge base of the subject already. I think I understand the basics pretty well (blocks, the process mining undergoes, etc.) but if there was anything you maybe found out along the way that wasn't inherently obvious at the get go I'd love to find out.
Edit: Thanks for the replies, this is actually the first post I've made (sober). I've got a decent bit of research looking into voltage costs/ down volting my GPU and downclocking the memory (I know surprising little about this as it's never been a necessity for me but i'm somewhat tech literate and I can use google pretty well so it shouldn't be an issue). Again, Thanks all!
submitted by scrumruckrun to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

A few questions about bitcoin?

*What do I do after mining, how do I put the bitcoins in my wallet?
*How do I buy stuff with bitcoin, do I need a credit card?
*While mining, my computer will go from 1.5 Mhash/s to 700 Mhash/s, is that normal?
*My wallet says that it is syncin and that it is 148 weeks late, can i still receive bitcoins.
I understand that these can seem like stupid questions to some of you, but i only download Bitcoin a few minutes ago, so thank you for your help.
submitted by loics to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

New to BitCoin Mining.

Right now my dad has a computer with the following stats:
*Intel i7 3930K Hex Core CPU
*64GB DDR3 System Memory
*ZX5 Dual ATi Eyefinity 7970 GPUs
*240GB Intel 520 Series SSD System Drive + Dual 2TB Automatic Backup Data Drives in RAID 1
I was thinking of investing in a 25 GH/s Bitcoin Miner
So my question is what else would I need for bitcoin mining? How much should I expect power usage to be? and I assume I'd be putting out 25,000 MHash/s...?
I'm real new at this but I'm figuring since I already have a solid CPU rig it wouldn't be too much more of an investment to start earning with bitcoin mining? or am I completely off-base with that?
submitted by thefaith1029 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Beginner here. I have a few questions.

I am interested in mining some (any) Bitcoins. I'm not really worried about cost efficiency because I'm only doing it for fun.
My computer has a GTX 650 2GB. I can get about 20 Mhash/s.
What is the best way to get Bitcoin with this setup? Should I ever expect to get even $1 worth of Bitcoin?
In the past I've used Deepbit.net (PPS) with GUIminer. Is there a better way?
Thanks for any advice you can offer.
submitted by shadowspectre69 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

How's your MHash rates and income / profit?

Sorry if that's a personal question.
I am heavily considering investing in a rig that will run at 700 MHash.
I was wondering if anybody in mtred felt like sharing what MHash they are running at and how much many bitcoins they are getting for that a week or month now / historically?
This would help me make a decision as to whether my investment is worthwhile.
I should also point out I am well aware that current rates will not necessarily reflect future rates due to the difficulty going up / exchange rates fluctuation etc, but if I can get an idea how people are doing now it would help a lot.
Thanks!
submitted by grahamu to mtred [link] [comments]

Want to invest in bitcoin but willing to accept more risk for more return? Maybe investing would be right for you!

As we all know, companies such as AsicMiner are currently kicking butt with their asics by releasing the eruptor blades and Erupter USB sticks for mining. This combined with their 28% or so of total hashing power for the entire bitcoin network is resulting in fantastic growth over the past few months, and their dividends are doing quite well.
If you are interested in shares of AsicMiner , check out either Direct Shares or Pass Through shares, which is just one share of AsicMiner. You can find them in auctions on bitcointalk as well as sites such as BTCT.TO
You can also get smaller shares known as micro shares. There are often times 1/100th of a full share so people can easier purchase them and provide an easier method for reinvesting dividends.
There are other shares too, such as AMC which just recieved a few Avalons they purchased a while ago. Keep in mind that the owners relations with others on the forum is quite poor and very unprofessional, so I would still consider it rather risky.
There are also companies which are not based on bitcoin but experimenting with it as a source of capital, such as KenilWorth on bitfunder, who are a mining company which finds raw material deposits and then sells them to another company (I think). The people with that company are VERY responsive on bitcointalk and seem to be very professional.
You can even if you wish bet on funds which are reliant upon BFL's shipping, such as HaveLock's Investments Mining Fund. The owner of that fund is also rather response on bitcointalk and is a very down to earth person from what I have seen. For example, they just purchased a single Jupiter rig from KnCMiner in an effort to diversify so if BFL fails they will not be destroyed.
They are also other funds out there which are designed to represent an amount of Mhash/s per each share, for example RedStarMining which aims to have 180 Ghash/s eventually, with each share containing 2.818 Mhash/s.
Also, a very cool thing about these funds is that they are very present on bitcointalk in the securities section, so you can see up to date discussion about each fund. For example, for red star mining, here is their thread: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=63257.0
You can even get a fund in an exchange, such as Crypto-Trade! Though, they seem to be having some major issues with their site for a while now, which is unfortuntate.
And you can get shares in the gambling site satoshidice!
There are tons of such securities available for lots of different styles people could choose, and because of bitcoin buying these shares is a very painless process. But do keep in mind that this is riskier than just holding bitcoin, and there are a good bit of scams prevalent in such securities, but if you keep an eye out and read their associated threads on bitcointalk you will be for the most part safe. Also, investing in companies like AsicMiner increases the network hash rate, making it even harder for a single entity to barge in and get more than 50% of the network hash rate, resulting in an even more secure network! These sometimes even hare shares which cost less than five dollars, so to get started you don't need much BTC at all.
And here is the link to bitcointalk for anyone who wants to do more research and look at any other funds which might be of interest. Don't forget that there are some funds which are not exchanged on these sites, for example group buys where each buyer holds a certain percentage of proceeds from a very expensive miner they pool together to buy. As earlier though, be careful.
There is also a really good subreddit for discussing these securities as well as others on /BitcoinStocks !
Edit: Added in bitcointalk threads for each security I listed.
Edit: It seems that there are nearly half as many downvotes as there are upvotes. Can anyone clarify?
submitted by hak8or to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Simple help for n00b

I posted this on the mining subreddit but it's not very active so here it goes:
Hey, got into bitcoin a while back not very seriously, I wanted to try out mining, all I have for the moment is macbook pro retina. Basically I followed this video (only for the setting up part): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPYbwO6nBe4
and was wondering what I should use?: http://i.imgur.com/5xuO2sc.png Should I just see what gives me the biggest Mhash/s?
And any idea on how looong it will take me to make my first 0.01 bitcoin?
Thanks!
submitted by anonboxis to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Very new, and still figuring things out. Please read and let me know what you think. I'm thinking about getting into mining.

First of all, let me tell you that electricity is included in my rent. So the cost factor is already taken care of.
My understanding is that there are many people out there that have built rigs that are using graphics cards, each capable of ~800 Mhash/sec, to successfully mine bitcoins. There is a hardware revolution on the horizon called Asics, which will bring the cost of hardware per hash WAY down. There's a gizmo called a "Jalapeno" that sells for about $165, that's capable of doing the same amount of work as as 5 or 6 graphic cards, but it's a chunk of hardware that's pretty much useless for doing anything but bitcoin mining, unlike a graphics card that can play games, etc.
This hardware advance is groundbreaking, and threatening to make the GPU approach obsolete.
As well, very soon, the reward for creating a block of bitcoins will be cut in half, from 50 to 25 coins.
There are just so many variables, and it's all just a little overwhelming. So I am asking for a bit of advice....
Does it make any sense to invest ~$400 in two Jalapenos, hook up with a pool, and let the bitch run 24/7? What pool should I go with? What returns can I expect?
What's a good pool for a newbie to play into, thinking pretty much a "fire and forget" approach?
And lastly, I am having trouble wrapping my head around the creation of bitcoins themselves. In economic terms, value is usually created as the result of work performed. It seems to me that bitcoins are created as a result of processor cycles devised to arbitrarily "discover" a block of coins. To whom does this work, or processor cycles, have value? It looks to me that bitcoins are literally being created out of thin air. Help me to understand how this works.
submitted by PJMurphy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to tell if my mined Bitcoins are going to my wallet? - total newbie.

Hi
I am using GUIminer and Bitcoin-qt at the moment, mining at approximately 400 Mhash/s. How can I confirm where the bitcoins are being sent? Does the system take time to update - i.e. become visible in my wallet? I have my miner sending to the correct address, I assume, so what is going on?
Thanks for any help
Edit: Nevermind - I just read on my pool website that the coins will be sent when I mine 0.01 BTC. I will leave this up here in case others have the same issue.
submitted by jacko4lyfyo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A Bitcoin Miracle (Story)

Ian had started mining bitcoins with all his friends in high school, as a hobby. He had researched the concept and realized it would be a fun thing to get involved in. His interest in it had been perked by his econ professor, when they discussed the pro's and con's of different types of currencies / payment methods in history. With his after school job stocking shelves he had saved up a bit of money and all he had to do was convince his parents the extra electricity him and his friends would be using of theirs, with the computers running in the basement. To save on costs, he wanted to keep the computers as cool as possible, using as much "passive" cooling as he could get away with. At dinner he spoke to his father, Ted, who like most parents, not only didn't understand what he was talking about, but claimed it was illegal on some level. "You can't just make money from thin air! The answer is no". Begrudgingly Ian went to his room and logged on to his and his friends favorite IRC server to let them know of the answer. Luckily Ian's bestfriend, Sara, had gotten the go ahead from her parents, who were thrilled she was interested in computers. They knew that any employment opportunities in the future their daughter would chase, would involve a strong grasp of current computing technologies. Unlike Ian's dad, Sara's parents had asked her how Bitcoin mining worked, and after she had explained it, her parents realized their daughter and friends weren't going to be actually printing money from thin air, but employing hardware and software to work for it. And electricity. They all agreed to meet tomorrow to plan it.
They met at lunch, outside, and sketched out the amount of money they'd need to spend in the start, as well as a monthly amount of cash they'd give to Sara to offset the cost of the electricity. They all were pretty amped about it, other then Ian. Ian returned home and decided that he'd do some mining on his own, regardless of what his father had said. He'd just sacrifice his own rooms electric power, so his father wouldn't ever notice it. This meant no more Xbox, no more air conditioning, and no more mini fridge. He built a small space in his closet, that had a hole for an air duct into the attic. With proper airflow achieved he began the process of transferring all his files from his desktop to his netbook. He had enough money for more graphics cards, but not an entire separate machine. He maxed out his computer with 4 HD 5830's after some research on cost/MHash, installed Ubuntu on the computer, started up cgminer on it, and configured the machine to mine with a few pools. He had them send bitcoins to a wallet he had made, in a truecrypt volume. Feeling pretty excited about it, he turned off his AC, and tried to fall asleep in the summer night.
Weeks and months and then a few years passed by, with some of Ian's time being spent at Sara's basement with the rest of the group, building their mining rigs, powering them on, configuring their mining pool, and making sure everything was running properly. One of Ian's friends dad was an engineer, and they had been able to borrow an infrared thermometer gun to double check the temperatures of the cards. Things were going real well. And when things are going well, something bad is bound to happen.
Ian began feeling more and more tired each morning. At first he thought it was because he was sleeping without the AC on, so he tried sleeping on the couch in the living room. Things only continued to get worst. Ian's mother took him to a doctor that accepted their health insurance, and after waiting a few weeks for blood tests, it turned out Ian had to have an MRI to verify a few things. The doctors soon saw the cause of his problems, which was a brain tumor that was causing elevated pressure in his head. Ian and his family went home to discuss what they would do, and how they'd pay for it.
While Ian's parents figured out a way to pay for surgery, they heard a crash come from the staircase. Ian had feinted on his way up to his room. As they carried him to the car all they heard him mutter was "bitcoins". Figuring it was due to him feinting they rushed him to the emergency room at the local hospital, where Ian was put in to a chemically induced coma, to prevent any brain damage.
Ian's friends came to visit him, but they visited less and less each week. One day, with only Ian's parents and Sara in the hospital room, the father mentioned to Sara the last thing Ian had said to him was something about bitcoin's, and he then told her about the fight he had had with Ian the year before. She smiled and told him about how they had ended up doing it at her basement, explaining what it was, and how most of their coins they had spent on pizza. She told him that the price of a bitcoin was rising, in U.S. dollars. The father smiled, realizing that his son may have been right all along, about the importance of a decentralized currency, and after Sara's explanation, it truly wasn't printing money from thin air. There was nothing illegal about it. A $20 dollar bill wasn't illegal because it could be used to buy drugs, so why should a bitcoin be illegal?
Later that night, Ian's father was going over the family bills that seemed to keep stacking up, trying to figure out how to pay for Ian's surgery, when he saw the electric bill was much higher then usual. He had recently turned the AC on in Ian's room, and plugged his mini-fridge in after stocking it with his favorite soda's, in anticipation of the day his son would come home. He went up to Ian's room and heard a whirring noise coming from Ian's closet. Behind a stack of comic books and shoe boxes he found Ian's desktop. "What was it doing back here?" He decided to give Sara a call, though it was late, she lived across the street so it wouldn't be a problem. He showed her what he had found, and after some clicking and typing, she hugged him and screamed for joy. Confused he asked her what was she so happy about. She showed him Ian's Bitcoin wallet, which was still mounted, and explained that Ian had been mining privately Bitcoins for awhile now. His Bitcoin wallet showed 1803.78004 BTC. Before Ian's father could ask why this was good news, Sara showed him the current rate of a bitcoin on mtgox, and after some calculations, Ian's father realized enough money existed to pay for Ian's surgery!
Sara spent the rest of the night setting up accounts on various BTC exchanges, transferring funds, and then trading bitcoins for U.S. dollars. The next day was spent going from bank to bank, to pick up wire transfers, and then it was time for Ian's surgery.
When Ian recovered from the surgery, Sara explained to him what had happened, while Ian's father and mother held his hands. Ian's dad apologized and told him he'd support his bitcoin hobby. Sara interjected and caught Ian up on how GPU mining was soon being replaced with ASIC mining. Ian looked up at his father and casually mentioned "Well... my birthday is coming up..."
|Just something that came to me on my bus ride this morning
submitted by qwertytard to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Scrub trying to mine

I'm a scrub looking to litecoin or bitcoin mine. I have a brand new R9 290 that I bought for gaming, I'm getting around 700 mhash/s in GUIminer using the middlecoin.com pool, what kind for returns can I expect and is this worth my time?
submitted by garthbartin to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Now Wafflepool have lost interest, sensible opinions on to join or not to join welcome!

Hi guys. Well, as predicted, the second we halvened, the Wafflepool stats went off us and on to Litecoin.
I have been mining and buying solely doge since I came across this awesome coin & community in early March. I have to be honest, while I love the community thing, I am in this mostly to try to make some long term money after telling myself Bitcoin was a load of guff back in early 2012.
I DO DONATE, I still can't figure out how to use tipbot but I have donated directly to valid causes on here. Only for the sake of seeing if this makes a difference to what people say I should do, I have amassed just about 8 Million Doge and plan on sitting on it.
I have 4.5Megahash spread across a few rigs running 24/7 and this won't change. What I am considering changing, is moving say 4Megahash to Wafflepool now that they don't like us currently. That and as some will know, they put up a poll asking if miners were interested in being paid in DOGE instead of Bitcoin. No idea what the end result will be but I am hedging my bets on them going for it!
With me not using ASICs and pulling a buttload of juice, I just don't think I can justify pointing the rigs to DOGE solely for now. At least if I wafflepooled it and they did change to pay me in Doge, it would be "as bad", non?
I would keep a "whole".5 Mhash pointed solely at Doge. Sorry for going on, please don't flame, I am just trying to weigh up my options and justify why I think for me personally at this point, swapping to one of those naughty pools may make sense, especially if they do allow DOGE payouts soon!
Cheers,
Nick :)
submitted by mrfootlong77 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

To the moon! Dogemining with BFGMiner, Debian, and ATI.

Visitor from the future! Hello. I'm a newbie digger and recently setup my first dedicated mining box in Debian. I'm not the most experienced Linux user, but the machine had started with Debian Squeeze and I couldn't find its old Windows key. (Also please forgive formatting errors, I'm new to this whole "Reddit" thing as well.)
I found a number of guides to misdirect me on my way, so I decided to write up a sort-of (or at least hopefully up-to-date) guide to create a Dogecoin miner on Debian with AMD cards, using BFGMiner to mine coins.
Expert digging shibes: I would certainly appreciate feedback to improve this guide.
This is not a headless mining guide. I have not reached that level of mastery yet, though I believe it is well within reach.
HOWTO
You can refer to this wiki source to understand the output from BFGMiner 3.10.0. The one gotcha I've observed is that BFGMiner will happily start off showing hash rates in KHash/sec, and after the first accepted block it will jump to MHashes/sec. When I first saw my hash speed appear to drop from "250" to "0.2", I panicked a little before seeing it had changed its orders of magnitude.
If you think you're still mining slowly, you might need to bump up the intensity for BFGMiner. Higher intensity means more work, and it's possible to create hardware failures if you set it too high. For my HD 5870s, I use an intensity of 12. You can either set the intensity by adding "-I 12" to the ./bfgminer line of doge_dig.sh, or you can adjust the value by pressing M in BFGMiner and working through the menu system from there.
Bonus: Multiple cards
What happens if I have multiple ATI cards on one rig, you ask? I had the same problem, and OpenCL would only recognize one of them! It turns out that there's an easy solution, but it costs $1.25 in resistors from your local radio shack: http://www.overclock.net/t/384733/the-30-second-dummy-plug
Plug the finished product from there into your second card. If you have more than two cards, you'll need to make one for every card you want to recognize without a monitor attached to it. Reboot and restart your mining, BFGMiner should recognize all of your cards now.
In theory, the above technique should allow you to run completely headless, as long as you also install SSH and be sure to have your script export DISPLAY=:0 before running BFGMiner. I haven't tried this, though.
Happy mining and welcome to the Moon! I hope this is helpful to someone.
submitted by indigodarkwolf to dogeducation [link] [comments]

I don't know what I'm doing, but I'm doing it! (Brand new to bitcoin mining!)

Hello fellow miners! I recently compiled cgminer on my Xubuntu machine, and am GPU mining with a GTX 260 at approximately 50 Mhashes/s.
Awesome!
But, I don't really know what this means! I'm using a public p2pool with a 0.5% fee, and I have a wallet set up with an address at blockchain. I have a few beginner questions!
  1. At 50 Mhashes per second, how long until I see even 0.01 bitcoins? I'm not looking to get rich, just to have a little fun and see that number go up!
  2. When do the transactions into my wallet occur? Daily? Do I have to finish an entire "chunk", like [email protected]?
  3. Is there any indication in the cgminer display pane for how many transactions (blocks?) I'm completing, and how that translates into bitcoins?
  4. The bitcoins that I earn from mining - who is paying me? The guy hosting the server? Or the people transferring funds, paying transaction fees?
Sorry for the obvious questions, I couldn't find an FAQ here and other resources I've looked for are a little over my head!
submitted by SpazzyMcHoolihan to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Just starting out, seeking some advice

Hey everyone!
I have known about bitcoin for a long time now but just recently decided I was going to mine it. I do not pay for electricity in my apartment so I thought what the hell, id give it a shot and mine while I am at class.
My computer currently has dual 6870s and I am currently pushing around 260 Mhash/s on each with -v -w128 flags. Is there any way to increase this? Should I be getting more?
My wallet is looking very empty but that is hopefully soon to change as I have joined btc guild as my pool. Do you guys know of a better one out there?
Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
submitted by W1ZZ4RD to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is a Bitcoin hash and SHA-256 - YouTube My Asics 2682 MHash Bitcoin Mining Rig (Digital Currency) $1K and 15 Mhash Worth of Bitcoin Mining Rigs - IS GPU MINING STILL PROFITABLE? - Mining Adventure3 What is a Bitcoin hash and SHA-256 - YouTube What is hash rate in Bitcoin ? - YouTube

Bitcoin Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for Bitcoin crypto-currency enthusiasts. It only takes a minute to sign up. Sign up to join this community. Anybody can ask a question Anybody can answer The best answers are voted up and rise to the top Bitcoin . Home ; Questions ; Tags ; Users ; Unanswered ; Jobs; What's the current $/Mhash [closed] Ask Question Asked 8 years, 4 months ago ... MHash Bitcoin. SHA-256 vs Scrypt vs Scrypt -N Hash Rates October 6, 2014 – 17:56. I was a little late to the mining game, and have been primarily focused on scrypt based coins with most of my herd of 270s pointed at our profit switching mining pool pool.cryptopros.com. I was talking with the the boys at Cryptopros (Clint and Pete) and received a major rash for possessing never ever mined ... Good content, and so Let me explained to an individual concerning one among our ideas inside bitcoin mining. For now it is quite tricky along with expensive in order to mine BTC and so find it well to test cloud exploration. Bitcoin Merkle Baum . Hash-Bäume können verwendet werden, um jede Art von Daten, die in und zwischen Computern gespeichert, verarbeitet und übertragen werden, zu überprüfen. Gegenwärtig wird Hash-Bäumen hauptsächlich verwendet, um sicherzustellen, dass Datenblöcke, die von anderen Peers in einem Peer-to-Peer-Netzwerk empfangen werden, unbeschädigt und unverändert empfangen werden ... Find out what your expected return is depending on your hash rate and electricity cost. Find out if it's profitable to mine Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, DASH or Monero. Do you think you've got what it takes to join the tough world of cryptocurrency mining?

[index] [37689] [49320] [26983] [6922] [44068] [12344] [24558] [13869] [37432] [42861]

What is a Bitcoin hash and SHA-256 - YouTube

This is just a brief look at my 5+ Mhash/sec litecoin mining rig. It uses a total of 9 7950's and a single 5870. At the current difficulty level, it is mining about 430 litecoins a month. Edit: as ... Start trading Bitcoin and cryptocurrency here: http://bit.ly/2Vptr2X Bitcoin is the first decentralized digital currency. All Bitcoin transactions are docume... mine bitcoin using amd a8 - bitcoin mining CPU AMD A8-5600 max mining speed 4 Mhash/s. mining on cpu wery slow becose 4 mhash\/s its maximum speed of mining with cpu amd. BITCOIN BREAKTHROUGH Series Join us Wecoa.org This video explains the concept of hashing and SHA-256 for newbies. For more information visit http://99bitcoins.com/what-is-bitcoin-hash/

#